Disclaimers and such

Date:August 22, 2007 / year-entry #311
Tags:other;pages
Orig Link:https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/oldnewthing/20070822-09/?p=25453
Comments:    2
Summary:Statements made in a general sense may have exceptions even if such exceptions are not explicitly acknowledged. Example: "Dogs have four legs." There are dogs which do not have four legs, but as a general rule, dogs have four legs. Statements are not independently fact-checked. They are based on personal experience and recollection, augmented by...

Statements made in a general sense may have exceptions even if such exceptions are not explicitly acknowledged. Example: "Dogs have four legs." There are dogs which do not have four legs, but as a general rule, dogs have four legs.

Statements are not independently fact-checked. They are based on personal experience and recollection, augmented by informed guesswork. Statements may even be intentionally incorrect for rhetorical purposes, for example, to avoid getting distracted by a side topic, or because it's a joke.

Not all quotation marks indicate literal quotation; some may represent an imaginary conversation or a fictionalization of a real conversation. All quotations are subject to editing, for example for reasons of space or privacy, but such editing is not meant to alter the basic sense of the original statement.

Phrases such as "some people" do not exclude the possibility that those people may be Microsoft employees. Microsoft employees are people, too. Similarly, "some programs" might include Microsoft programs.

There is no correction policy.

Statements do not establish the official position of Microsoft Corporation. Recommendations and advice are those of the author (or people and organizations the author trusts).

Contents are provided "AS IS" with no warranties and confer no rights.

In summary, readers are expected to employ critical thinking skills to evaluate statements in context.


Comments (2)
  1. Some of you who grew up with Sesame Street may recall the old short they ran with the catchy lyric that

  2. So yesterday in The most important language in the whole wide world is yours, and you hardly even know

Comments are closed.


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