USER and GDI compatibility in Windows Vista

Date:April 5, 2006 / year-entry #122
Tags:other
Orig Link:https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/oldnewthing/20060405-59/?p=31643
Comments:    7
Summary:My colleague Nick Kramer who works over on WPF has the first of what will be a series of articles on USER and GDI compatibility in Windows Vista. The changes to tighten security, improve support for East Asian languages, and take the desktop to a new level with the Desktop Window Manager (among others) make...

My colleague Nick Kramer who works over on WPF has the first of what will be a series of articles on USER and GDI compatibility in Windows Vista. The changes to tighten security, improve support for East Asian languages, and take the desktop to a new level with the Desktop Window Manager (among others) make for quite an interesting compatibility risk list.

And since I mentioned the DWM, you would do well to check out Greg Schechter who has been writing about the Desktop Window Manager, how it works, how it fits into the rest of the system, all that stuff. I know some people have been posting comments asking for information about the DWM. You would be much better served asking Greg since he actually works on it, whereas all I know about the DWM is how to spell it.

[Links fixed: 9am.]


Comments (7)
  1. James Risto says:

    Sometimes I feel like an old curmudgeon; bah, give me a lite Vista without this new goo and I will continue to run my non-video intensive apps and life with click-and-drag weirdness on my Trio64. Sheesh!

    At other times, I feel like I would dread to have even another Vista version and I will bear the transition with everyone else. Change is change; it will be better.

    I feel like a curmudgeon just mentioning this somewhat tread-upon topic.

  2. 8 says:

    Interesting read. "when applications do painting that’s not part of a WM_PAINT" almost sounds like a post title on this blog :)

    I always use InvalidateRect to have Windows send the proper WM_PAINT message. Makes the program much more procedural, and that makes the program more robust and easier to maintain.

  3. Jorge Coelho says:

    Windows Vista having ‘live’ content of everything currently on the screen is very exciting news for me: that’s how they manage to have a ‘live’ snapshot of tasks in the taskbar. Cool. :-)

  4. Michael J. says:

    I always wanted to ask, but could not find a relevant thread. Anyway, why do you explain how to work with WinAPI, if Vista will have WinFX and all .Net related new API? Does it still make sense to learn WinAPI for those who don’t know it well?

  5. Andy W. says:

    Isn’t it great that we now have an egg timer than can suck up 35% of the CPU time?

  6. Jorge Coelho says:

    Hehe!

    But, come on, every OS version release has raised the ‘minimum expected hardware to run’ level. I still remember thinking 8 MB of memory was a lot of RAM to run Win 3.0 in. In those days, a single video file was enough to fill your hard disk.

    Aren’t you glad the hardware has evolved to keep up with the software? With the current processors you can do things in a normal desktop PC you wouldn’t dream of 10 years ago.

    Software that pushes the envelope of what can be done with current hardware *is* a good thing: it stimulates evolution on the hardware front, allowing you to do more and better things… like egg timers. ;-)

  7. Chris Becke says:

    I do all my painting outside of WM_PAINT. Thats all to an offscreen cache of my window contents however. Then of course I blit *that* to my window.

    I havn’t yet found a better way to write a high fps "game" using straight GDI.

Comments are closed.


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