Storsjöodjur hunting season will opening soon

Date:September 10, 2004 / year-entry #333
Tags:non-computer
Orig Link:https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/oldnewthing/20040910-00/?p=37893
Comments:    3
Summary:Scotland doesn't have the corner on monsters in lakes. You'll also find them in Norway, in Sweden (read about a recent expedition), and in Canada, among many, many others. Anywhere there are lakes, there's bound to be a legend about a monster in one of them. It appears, however that Sweden's Storsj÷odjur is about to...

Scotland doesn't have the corner on monsters in lakes. You'll also find them in Norway, in Sweden (read about a recent expedition), and in Canada, among many, many others. Anywhere there are lakes, there's bound to be a legend about a monster in one of them.

It appears, however that Sweden's Storsjöodjur is about to lose its protected species status, owing to an inquiry inspired by a man's request to harvest the creature's eggs so he can hatch them.

As a result, it will soon be open season on Storsjöodjuret. Happy hunting.

(I find the Swedish word odjur somewhat poetic. It translates as "monster" but literally means "un-animal".)


Comments (3)
  1. Miles Archer says:

    Herb Caen once wrote about a "Van Ness" Monster in the SF Bay. I know a guy who’s convinced there’s a monster in Lake Tahoe.

  2. Johan Thelin says:

    The form o-djur, where "o" can means "un", is very often used in the northen parts of Sweden. Some forms, such as odjur, are used through out the country, but my grand father who grew up in Boden, asks if the paper is oläst (un-read) before taking it, instead of asking if someone has read it.

  3. Johann Gerell says:

    And, also in the northern of Sweden, if you haven’t shopped today, then you have "ohandlat" (un-shopped). :-)

Comments are closed.


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