When marketing designs a screenshot

Date:December 17, 2003 / year-entry #166
Tags:other
Orig Link:https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/oldnewthing/20031217-00/?p=41463
Comments:    17
Summary:Have you checked out AMD's ads for their AMD Athlon 64 FX processor? The copy reads, "My adrenalin fix isn't what it used to be. Double the dose. AMD me." And it has a picture of a tough-looking guy glaring at the camera, challenging the reader to do their worst. But take a look at...

Have you checked out AMD's ads for their AMD Athlon 64 FX processor? The copy reads, "My adrenalin fix isn't what it used to be. Double the dose. AMD me." And it has a picture of a tough-looking guy glaring at the camera, challenging the reader to do their worst.

But take a look at what's on his screen. It's a giant command window. Now look at what this adrenalin junkie has been typing into his command window:

Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\>fg
'fg' is not recognized as an internal or external command,
operable program or batch file.

C:\>
C:\>
C:\>
C:\>
C:\>sdf
'sdf' is not recognized as an internal or external command,
operable program or batch file.

C:\>sdf
'sdf' is not recognized as an internal or external command,
operable program or batch file.

C:\>
C:\>
C:\>df
'df' is not recognized as an internal or external command,
operable program or batch file.

Wow, he's a real l33t h4x0r he iz.


Comments (17)
  1. Florian says:

    Maybe he is a Unix guy who had to sit at an XP PC? I dunno what "sdf" is though. Then again, the order of the commands doesn’t make any sense either, so I guess they just needed /something/ on the screen.

  2. Matt C. Wilson says:

    fg, sdf, and df are all sequential keys on a qwerty keyboard… so yeah, I’m leaning towards the latter. :) That or he’s so hopped-up on "adrenalin" that he’s lost his marbles. Is that even the right version number for the 64-bit XP?

  3. Michael C. says:

    Got any links to these ads? :)

  4. Raymond Chen says:

    All I have is the print version.

  5. Jason says:

    hahaa I noticed that same ad while reading through Popular Science. You don’t need the latest AMD processor to do it — I used to easily do the same thing on my 286 @ 8MHz.

  6. asdf says:

    I didn’t know XP ran AMD-64 yet.

  7. Mike Dimmick says:

    32-bit Windows XP still runs on AMD-64 systems, but doesn’t give user programs access to any more than 2Gb of virtual address space at any one time.

    Windows XP 64-bit Edition for AMD64 processors is (and Raymond can correct, I’m sure) not due to be released until XP Service Pack 2 is released in mid 2004 (according to http://www.microsoft.com/windows/lifecycle/servicepacks.mspx).

    Raymond, can you shed any light on why XP/AMD64 has apparently taken a long time compared to the processors’ release? As long as that doesn’t affect any NDAs, of course…

  8. John Topley says:

    Will Microsoft finally get around to implementing the fg and sdf commands in Longhorn? ;-)

  9. Mike Dunn says:

    That reminds me of an MS Office 2K3 ad that I hate. It’s the one in the meeting room where everyone is cutting down the projection screen. The ads poses this sticky situation:

    The numbers [for Q3 or whatever] changed the night before your presentation.

    Then it says Office cured it like this:

    Your presentation changed too.

    Now, I may be dim but isn’t that describing embedding an Excel sheet in the Powerpoint file? That’s plain old OLE which has been around forever.

  10. Ehm, Raymond, just a little bit off-topic, but will you archive the blogs on the old site here or will they be lost forever *shudder*?

  11. Raymond Chen says:

    The old site will stay up, just in readonly mode.

  12. Jeremy says:

    Does anyone have an actual screenie or scan of this ad? It would be awesome to see.

  13. Raymond Chen says:

    I typed "double the dose. amd me" into google and out popped

    http://sachz.blogdrive.com/comments?id=42

    And with that I’m going to close commenting on this article that is six months old.

Comments are closed.


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